EagleTac D25LC2 Clicky

EagleTac continues to provide new models and excellent features in their ever-expanding line of lights. Is the D25LC2 simply a re-hash of any number of existing EDC style lights, or does it hold something unique to stand out from the crowd?

EagleTac D25LC2

EagleTac D25LC2

Meat and Potatoes

First glance at the EagleTac D25LC2 clicky brings to mind very similar lights from the likes of 4Sevens, Fenix, and more. It is quite a compact 2 cell EDC light reminiscent of much that we have already seen. The reason behind this however, is this style of torch is very appealing. People don’t all want to be carrying something tacti-cool and aggressive, but often times are looking for something far more pragmatic. The D25 fills those shoes quite well. It is a simply stated light with a purely cylindrical form factor that fits nicely into either a pocket or the included rigid nylon holster.

Decoratively, this light stays with a fairly minimalist approach. The few bands of standard knurling are enough to increase grip, but not overly aggressive by any stretch. Without scalloping or crenellations on either head or tail, the light is quite pocket friendly. It also tailstands relatively well, though the switch does protrude ever so slightly past the ring, causing a little instability. Fit and finish though are on par with the EagleTac standard. Solid, uniform anodizing, and an absence of unfinished rough edges throughout. EagleTac definitely makes a solid product, of this I am certain.

EagleTac D25LC2

EagleTac D25LC2

Though this light is nothing unusual in size for a 2xCR123A powered torch, it has one advantage I haven’t seen yet. It is also capable of using the rechargeable Li-ion 18650 cell. Considering that aspect, it is one of the smallest such lights I have yet seen. It even possesses unique features generally reserved for much higher end lights such as the stainless steel bezel to protect against deforming the head when it gets dropped. It even has some form of titanium coating to both provide better scratch resistance and color uniformity with the remainder of the black anodized light.

Running a U2 bin Cree XM-L LED in a narrow reflector that has a very light stipple produces quite a nice, smooth, relatively floody beam. This die does manage over 500 lumens out the front on Max, providing ample light for nearly any situation. Once again I am really enjoying these larger die LEDs because they have a tendency to produce the beamshapes that I prefer. Floody light has been far more practically useful in my experience than needle thin beams, but if a tighter focus is your desire, I do believe this model is available with other options such as the XP-Gand the newly minted XT-E (hope I get to try one of those soon).

Cree XM-L

Cree XM-L

Constructive Criticism

The D25 clicky series are marketed as semi-programmable, multi-mode flashlights. Their common 2 “line” operation being activated by simply having the head tightened or loosened for either Turbo or General modes, respectively. General mode has a basic L-M-H setup with a host of blinky modes placed after the 2nd run through the cycle, and Turbo mode simply alternates between screaming full power, and nausea inducing strobe. Once again, there are no real surprises here, but simply a quality setup in a familiar package. The user interface though is where I hold some points of contention as well.

The supposed programmable aspect of the D25LC2 manifests as your choice of mode memory or not, as well as some slight control over the brightness levels in general mode. While I do believe I was able to access the differences in general mode output by following the prescribed technique, I found their actual variance to be so subtle I had a genuine difficult time seeing the differences between the lower set and the higher one. My experience though with mode memory selection was far less successful. Try as I might I have to this day not been successful in turning mode memory on. Thankfully, my preference is off anyway, but it would have been far more appealing for me to be able to report on its usefulness to those of you who enjoy it.

Shipped alongside the D25LC2 is an apparently high quality rigid nylon holster. This holster even sports a metal snap, rather than the hook and loop fasteners found in the vast majority of similar retention devices. At first I thought this was an excellent touch, since I so despise the sound of Velcro being opened, but just recently, barely 2 weeks into ownership and suddenly my snap fastener rips out of the flap where it was contained. Now what used to function as a holster closure is nothing more than a dust cover. I was hoping for higher quality than the norm here, but unfortunately I believe that hope was unfounded.

Holster snap

Holster snap

Conclusions

The D25LC2 is hardly a departure from the norm. it isn’t the type of light that gets people immediately wondering “Wow, what is that thing?!”, but it still ends up being one that people sit and quietly think “I like that one, it was really nice.” It’s nothing you haven’t seen before, but rather a collection of things you have seen, done better.

EagleTac D25LC2

EagleTac D25LC2

Provided for review by the kind folks at EagleTac.

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