NiteCore MT25

Once again NiteCore opens up the market with an entire new lineup of lights. Can the Multi-Task series perform as usefully as their name implies?

NiteCore MT25

NiteCore MT25

Meat and Potatoes

NiteCore’s Multi-Task series is a new line of lights with a very strong genetic similarity. No matter what battery combination you might use as your preferred power source, NiteCore has you covered. These lights range from a single AA to 2×18650 cells, harnessing them to provide bright outputs that are well matched to their individual abilities.

I have had the opportunity to check out the NiteCore MT25 flavor for a while now and I definitely think they are worth a second look. Powered by either an 18650 or a pair of CR123A cells, the MT25 uses this power to drive it’s Cree XP-G (gen1) LED to pretty incredible levels. Sitting behind a well-polished smooth reflector, this smaller die LED (if you compare it to the now mainstream XM-L) manages to project an incredibly tightly focused beam. The MT25 is definitely a throw-centric light. It has a very tight and bright hotspot that is really capable of putting a circle of light out on nearby treelines. There is a broad transitional corona that keeps the light useful for shorter distances, and the spillbeam remains relatively bright, but I would in no way classify this as floody. It’s a thrower to the bitter end.

Cree XP-G

Cree XP-G

The UI of the Multi-Task series is all identical. They feature a simple two mode inerface. Fully tightnening the head will always give you Turbo output. With nearly 400 lumens, this definitely makes an impression. This is a very handy feature, helping to prevent possible confusion if you find yourself in an intense situation. Slightly loosening he head though will place you into a general use mode that gives you your choice of 3 lower powered outputs or even a few select blinkey modes. This line has a mode memory so you can theoretically set it and forget it, always having your favorite secondary mode at hand. I am a little underwhelmed at not having access to a truly low mode, but in all honesty, not every light is designed to fill every role. I think that a lack of “Moon” mode is a bigger deal on the small EDC sized lights than it is on a more tactical piece such as this.

I’ve always considered NiteCore to be quite decent when it comes to fit and finish, but I think it would be safe to say that they appear to be stepping up their game a notch with this series. Thick anodizing, crisp lettering, and attention to details like chamfers and bevels are the order of the day. This light simply looks good. It might not be my absolute favorite in the design department, but it is a quality piece of work for certain.

Constructive Criticism

Chamfers and bevels are all well and good, but there is still one particular aspect of the MT25 that I take specific objection to. The tailcap once again bears the result of trying to please two entirely separate crowds. Instead of choosing sides and either putting a full tailstanding ring around the switch or leaving it off entirely for easy access, NiteCore has chosen one of my biggest pet peeves and given a pair of tailstanding nubs with large cutouts for access. Especially considering the thin nature of these “support nubs” this only makes for a light that is more difficult to access than a true protruding switch. With the tactical nature of this particular model, I believe full protrusion would be the most ideal. But hey, even though it is a little annoying poking out around the switch like that, at least it doesn’t tailstand particularly well…wait, that didn’t sound right.

The worst of both worlds?

The worst of both worlds?

I don’t know if it is simply the nature of mode memory, or if I’m just particularly susceptible to this, but the mode memory lights I have tried that just require you to cycle the power in ordered to change modes all seem to give me fits. I always seem to find myself firing the light up in the wrong mode. The number of times that I accidentally light up the inside of a nice, reflective machine with a full power strobe is frustratingly large. I have had trouble with other lights that use similar operational techniques, but I far prefer lights to use a more complex method of choosing modes if possible.

Conclusions

The NiteCore MT25 is a very well made light. Very bright, durable, and super throwy. This light definitely lives up to its name by being capable of multiple tasks.

NiteCore MT25

NiteCore MT25

Provided for review by the kind folks at NiteCore.

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3 Comments

  1. Wow, this light looks great, but cr123 cells are a bit hard to find around here

  2. CR123A cells aren’t exactly commonplace around here either unfortunately. Thankfully there are quite a few quality retailers online that offer extremely competitive prices.

  3. Everything from the design, looks, features and usability is just amazing. The head has been intentionally tightened to give a Turbo output of over 400 lumens. The fit and finish makes NiteCore reflect quite a decent appearance.

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